Why not bring a portable scanner when you visit family this summer?

by Sally J.

in * How to SHARE Your Photographs (and the stories behind them), Free Articles / Blog

Are you heading out to visit family in the next few weeks? Maybe you have a big reunion scheduled this summer.

Here’s something to consider:

Portable Scanners Are Very Affordable. If you have a laptop and $80 in your family history budget, you could purchase a brand new portable scanner and bring it with you. Just imagine returning from your trip with digital copies of one-of-a-kind, antique family photographs, letters and documents. You know, the treasures that no one will EVER allow out of the house.

Scan and Share. You can use the scanning time to collect family stories. Or write down important information on the backs of the originals if no one has done it yet. And thanks to the wonders of our Instant Digital Age, you can burn a set onto a CD and hand it to the family member who owns the originals. Regular CDs are fine as long as it’s only for short term storage. For long term storage, I recommend MAM-A Gold CDs or an external hard drive. It’s great to upload an extra set to the online storage company of your choice, but don’t rely on them to store your photographs indefinitely.

My Portable Scanner Recommendation: I’ve had a CanoScan LiDE for years and I love, love, love it. I’ve been meaning to blather about it here for weeks. Here are some of its great features:

  • Lightweight enough to carry around.
  • The box it came in has a carrying handle so no need to buy a separate case.
  • Powered by USB cord, no separate power cord needed.
  • The platen locks to prevent damage while in transit (I’m sure all portable scanners do this, but I was impressed).
  • Lid removes completely, allowing for scanning of bound volumes and oversize materials without squashing.
  • Great quality high resolution scans for under $100.

I’m not alone in my love for the LiDE. Becky over at kinexxions is singing the praises of her new Canon LiDE 70. Her post was my inspiration to dust mine off and get it uploaded.

Stay Tuned: Later this week I’ll share tips on how to name your digital files so you can find them again, how to scan originals without damaging them, and how to safely mark the originals so they don’t end up as orphan photos in the attic.

Related articles you might have missed:
Flash drives not recommended for long term storage.
Digitally restoring photographs.
Do you know about this digital printing feature?
Will JPEG be around in twenty years?

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